The current thought is that post-training protein synthesis is maxed out with 20-25 grams of whey. However, much of the literature addressing protein requirements post resistance training have used protocols that include multiple sets of only a single exercise targeting a single muscle group. Since a single training session should most often target multiple muscle groups with multiple exercises, it is reasonable that maximal protein synthesis may be supported by higher protein intake. Nice to see some additional evidence where training is more similar to what may actually be implemented.

As always, it is probably best to simply cover all of your basis and don’t wait until training has ended.

  • Eat a reasonable pre-training meal.
  • Sip on a whey/carb shake while training.
  • Finish or have another whey/carb shake post training (or just eat a good meal).

The response of muscle protein synthesis following whole‐body resistance exercise is greater following 40 g than 20 g of ingested whey protein
http://physreports.physiology.org/content/4/15/e12893

Abstract

The currently accepted amount of protein required to achieve maximal stimulation of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) following resistance exercise is 20–25 g. However, the influence of lean body mass (LBM) on the response of MPS to protein ingestion is unclear. Our aim was to assess the influence of LBM, both total and the amount activated during exercise, on the maximal response of MPS to ingestion of 20 or 40 g of whey protein following a bout of whole‐body resistance exercise. Resistance‐trained males were assigned to a group with lower LBM (≤65 kg; LLBM n = 15) or higher LBM (≥70 kg; HLBM n = 15) and participated in two trials in random order. MPS was measured with the infusion of 13C6‐phenylalanine tracer and collection of muscle biopsies following ingestion of either 20 or 40 g protein during recovery from a single bout of whole‐body resistance exercise. A similar response of MPS during exercise recovery was observed between LBM groups following protein ingestion (20 g – LLBM: 0.048 ± 0.018%·h−1; HLBM: 0.051 ± 0.014%·h−1; 40 g – LLBM: 0.059 ± 0.021%·h−1; HLBM: 0.059 ± 0.012%·h−1). Overall (groups combined), MPS was stimulated to a greater extent following ingestion of 40 g (0.059 ± 0.020%·h−1) compared with 20 g (0.049 ± 0.020%·h−1; P = 0.005) of protein. Our data indicate that ingestion of 40 g whey protein following whole‐body resistance exercise stimulates a greater MPS response than 20 g in young resistance‐trained men. However, with the current doses, the total amount of LBM does not seem to influence the response.